POPEYE

FEDERALJACK.COM REPORTER ASSAULTED, ARRESTED IN MIAMI FOR FILMING MJTF

UPDATE (05-03-2013): WATCH THE VIDEO BELOW BY LUKE OF WAC WHERE HE INTERVIEWS ALEX OF FEDERALJACK.COM ABOUT HIS ARREST AND THE INCREDIBLE STORY THAT ENSUED.

Multi-Jurisdictional Gang Task Force violently abducts reporter, police destroy footage

{UPDATE: CHARGE OF RESISTING ARREST DROPPED AND THE FOOTAGE RECOVERED! THANKS OPEN SOURCE SOFTWARE COMMUNITY!!!}
{Another Update: One of the arresting officers, Richard Anastasi of the Miami Beach Police Department, has been arrested and sentenced to a federal prison term for kidnapping…. LOL!}


(FederalJack.com) – SOUTH BEACH, FL – A reporter for FEDERALJACK.COM was arrested at 3:15am in front of the Royal Palm Hotel Lowes Hotel on Miami Beach during Urban (Hip Hop) Beach Week for obstructing an investigation. The charge was later changed to resisting arrest without violence, and the arrest was considered a Gang Activity and Fraud Activity related arrest according to the arrest affidavit.

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Recent reports from the Miami Herald indicated that the ACLU and NAACP were keeping close watch on the police activity. Reporters from the FederalJack.com Tyranny Response Squad were dispatched to South Beach with video cameras, audio recorders, and flyers urging attendees to report police oppression to the ACLU hotline.

Upon approaching the Royal Palm Hotel, the reporters noticed dozens of agents from the Muti-Jurisdictional Gang Task Force conducting unwarranted searches of several young black men. The cameras started rolling. An officer approached the reporter and said “You’re really pissing me off with that  fucking camera.”

He closed the camera to diffuse the situation, however the camera continued to record video and audio. Upon walking away, the reporter had his arm grabbed and bent back by an agent from the MJTF. He was choked and slammed on the pavement, while being interrogated with questions about his country of citizenship.

An unidentified member of the MJTF was heard by the reporter to remark, “Is that FederalJack.com?” Other remarks made by the agents involved threats of sodomy and related tortures.

The reporter spent a total of 16 hours in custody of the Miami-Dade County Corrections department. He was first brought in to the Miami Beach Police Department, and was held for approximately 3 hours.

While in the possession of police officials, the digital memory of the camera was erased.

He was then transfered to the downtown Justice Center and held for an additional 13 hours. At 10:10am the required $1000 bond was posted, and he was still held for over 8 additional hours. He was released at approximately 6:30 pm.

FederalJack.com is currently investigating legal defense options.

More detailed information, video, audio, photos, and arrest documents will be posted as they are made available.

If you have encountered any police brutality during the festivities at South Beach, please submit any stories, images, video, or documents to jack@federaljack.com

Catholic bank caught investing on immoral shares.

Contraceptive pill

The Catholic Church is staunchly against the use of the pill

A Roman Catholic bank in Germany has apologised after admitting it bought stocks in defence, tobacco and birth control companies.

Der Spiegel newspaper discovered the bank had invested 580,000 euros (£495,310, $826,674) in British arms company BAE Systems.

It also invested 160,000 euros in American birth control pill maker Wyeth and 870,000 euros in tobacco companies.

The bank apologised for behaviour “not in keeping with ethical standards”.

Pax Bank has previously advertised ethical investment funds, specifically claiming to avoid arms and tobacco companies along with organisations that do not adhere to Catholic beliefs.

The Catholic Church has historically condemned the use of contraception, for breaking the link between sex and procreation – a view emphatically upheld by current Pope Benedict XVI.

In the past he has called birth control a “grave sin”.

A spokesman for Pax Bank said: “We will rectify the mistakes immediately without negative consequences for our clients.

“Unfortunately in a few internal reviews, the critical investments in question were overlooked – we deeply regret this.”

The spokesman thanked journalists for bringing the controversial investments to its attention.

FEMA NATIONAL LEVEL MARTIAL LAW EXERCISES 7-27-09

FEMA NATIONAL LEVEL MARTIAL LAW EXERCISES 7-27-09 Foreign soldiers will be utilized in a joint intelligence operation

Firearm confiscation in region VI

prepare , you’re not going to hear about this on mainstream media…it is on FEMA.GOV

Source: FEMA Website http://www.fema.gov/media/fact_sheets/nle09.shtm

Revolutionary Espresso Book Machine launches in London

It’s not elegant and it’s not sexy – it looks like a large photocopier – but the Espresso Book Machine is being billed as the biggest change for the literary world since Gutenberg invented the printing press more than 500 years ago and made the mass production of books possible. Launching today at Blackwell’s Charing Cross Road branch in London, the machine prints and binds books on demand in five minutes, while customers wait.

Signalling the end, says Blackwell, to the frustration of being told by a bookseller that a title is out of print, or not in stock, the Espresso offers access to almost half a million books, from a facsimile of Lewis Carroll’s original manuscript for Alice in Wonderland to Mrs Beeton’s Book of Needlework. Blackwell hopes to increase this to over a million titles by the end of the summer – the equivalent of 23.6 miles of shelf space, or over 50 bookshops rolled into one. The majority of these books are currently out-of-copyright works, but Blackwell is working with publishers throughout the UK to increase access to in-copyright writings, and says the response has been overwhelmingly positive.

“This could change bookselling fundamentally,” said Blackwell chief executive Andrew Hutchings. “It’s giving the chance for smaller locations, independent booksellers, to have the opportunity to truly compete with big stock-holding shops and Amazon … I like to think of it as the revitalisation of the local bookshop industry. If you could walk into a local bookshop and have access to one million titles, that’s pretty compelling.”

From academics keen to purchase reproductions of rare manuscripts to wannabe novelists after a copy of their self-published novels, Blackwell believes the Espresso – a Time magazine “invention of the year” – can cater to a wide range of needs, and will be monitoring customer usage closely over the next few months as it looks to pin down pricing (likely to be around the level of traditional books) and demand. It then hopes to roll it out across its 60-store network, with its flagship Oxford branch likely to be an early recipient as well as a host of smaller, campus-based shops.

The brainchild of American publisher Jason Epstein, the Espresso was a star attraction at the London Book Fair this week, where it was on display to interested publishers. Hordes were present to watch it click and whirr into action, printing over 100 pages a minute, clamping them into place, then binding, guillotining and spitting out the (warm as toast) finished article. The quality of the paperback was beyond dispute: the text clear, unsmudged and justified, the paper thick, the jacket smart, if initially a little tacky to the touch.

Described as an “ATM for books” by its US proprietor On Demand Books, Espresso machines have already been established in the US, Canada and Australia, and in the Bibliotheca Alexandrina in Egypt, but the Charing Cross Road machine is the first to be set up in a UK bookstore. It cost Blackwell some $175,000, but the bookseller believes it will make this back in a year. “I do think this is going to change the book business,” said Phill Jamieson, Blackwell head of marketing. “It has the potential to be the biggest change since Gutenberg and we certainly hope it will be. And it’s not just for us – it gives the ability to small independent bookshops to compete with anybody.”

Revolutionary Espresso Book Machine launches in London

book machine

It’s not elegant and it’s not sexy – it looks like a large photocopier – but the Espresso Book Machine is being billed as the biggest change for the literary world since Gutenberg invented the printing press more than 500 years ago and made the mass production of books possible. Launching today at Blackwell’s Charing Cross Road branch in London, the machine prints and binds books on demand in five minutes, while customers wait.

Signalling the end, says Blackwell, to the frustration of being told by a bookseller that a title is out of print, or not in stock, the Espresso offers access to almost half a million books, from a facsimile of Lewis Carroll’s original manuscript for Alice in Wonderland to Mrs Beeton’s Book of Needlework. Blackwell hopes to increase this to over a million titles by the end of the summer – the equivalent of 23.6 miles of shelf space, or over 50 bookshops rolled into one. The majority of these books are currently out-of-copyright works, but Blackwell is working with publishers throughout the UK to increase access to in-copyright writings, and says the response has been overwhelmingly positive.

“This could change bookselling fundamentally,” said Blackwell chief executive Andrew Hutchings. “It’s giving the chance for smaller locations, independent booksellers, to have the opportunity to truly compete with big stock-holding shops and Amazon … I like to think of it as the revitalisation of the local bookshop industry. If you could walk into a local bookshop and have access to one million titles, that’s pretty compelling.”

From academics keen to purchase reproductions of rare manuscripts to wannabe novelists after a copy of their self-published novels, Blackwell believes the Espresso – a Time magazine “invention of the year” – can cater to a wide range of needs, and will be monitoring customer usage closely over the next few months as it looks to pin down pricing (likely to be around the level of traditional books) and demand. It then hopes to roll it out across its 60-store network, with its flagship Oxford branch likely to be an early recipient as well as a host of smaller, campus-based shops.

The brainchild of American publisher Jason Epstein, the Espresso was a star attraction at the London Book Fair this week, where it was on display to interested publishers. Hordes were present to watch it click and whirr into action, printing over 100 pages a minute, clamping them into place, then binding, guillotining and spitting out the (warm as toast) finished article. The quality of the paperback was beyond dispute: the text clear, unsmudged and justified, the paper thick, the jacket smart, if initially a little tacky to the touch.

Described as an “ATM for books” by its US proprietor On Demand Books, Espresso machines have already been established in the US, Canada and Australia, and in the Bibliotheca Alexandrina in Egypt, but the Charing Cross Road machine is the first to be set up in a UK bookstore. It cost Blackwell some $175,000, but the bookseller believes it will make this back in a year. “I do think this is going to change the book business,” said Phill Jamieson, Blackwell head of marketing. “It has the potential to be the biggest change since Gutenberg and we certainly hope it will be. And it’s not just for us – it gives the ability to small independent bookshops to compete with anybody.”

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